A mother's example passed on to her daughters for Anzac

By Taroi Black

Volunteers are the backbone of many Anzac events. In Ruatoki, a family of sisters are continuing the legacy of their late grandparents and mother to ensure the next generation will always remember.

It is always on the eve of Anzac where whānau, mostly women from across Ruatoki come together to help set up their beloved Te Rewarewa Marae.

The kaupapa can take a "couple of months" to prepare, Karnnie Ann McCorkindale says, which is part of a family legacy to help assist whānau with their putiputi/reefs and photographs within their wharekai Anzac Hall. 

This year is also poignant for Karnnie Ann and her sisters with the passing of their mother Majorie Rita Tumanako McCorkindale last year.

She was a stalwart in many respects to her Ruatoki community relating to the operations at the back in Anzac Hall - a central hub for locals who attend during the commemorations.

"You have to be mentally prepared for this kaupapa - it's a big job", younger sister Jade McCorkindale says. 

Hinga atu he tetekura, ara mai he tetekura.

Now, Majorie's daughters want to take on the mantle helping to facilitate their annual event around decorating the hall and handling the list of names of those who contributed to the defence force.  

McCorkindale whanau / Te Ao News